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Pemaquid Point | Kaplan Thompson Architects

Pemaquid Point | Kaplan Thompson Architects

Pemaquid Point | Kaplan Thompson Architects

Pemaquid Point | Kaplan Thompson Architects

Pemaquid Point | Kaplan Thompson Architects

Pemaquid Point | Kaplan Thompson Architects

Pemaquid Point | Kaplan Thompson Architects

Pemaquid Point | Kaplan Thompson Architects

Pemaquid Point | Kaplan Thompson Architects

Pemaquid Point | Kaplan Thompson Architects

Pemaquid Point | Kaplan Thompson Architects

Pemaquid Point | Kaplan Thompson Architects

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Context

A family living abroad wanted a new Maine home to replace the trailer they had occupied on regular visits back to the States. It would also house an aging parent who would serve as caretaker year round. They desired a more intimate connection with the abutting Coombs Cove and a distant view of Fort Charles at the Colonial Pemaquid State Historic Site, one of the earliest sites of European occupation in North America. They also needed a protected outdoor kitchen to handle the intensity of the frequent Thai meals they loved to cook on a regular basis.

Response

A modest, 1200 square foot home lives large due to lots of glass, emphasizing the connection to the outdoors. This same glass will significantly reduce the heating costs of the house and allow the owners to achieve net zero energy with fewer solar panels. An open plan with two-story space connects the floors. Only modest-sized bedrooms were desired, since the family did not spend much time there, but when they did, the views would be tremendous. A glassy, cantilevered toilet room off the master bath provides a unique experience, seeming to float within the patio roof.

Renewable Materials

All materials that have been used throughout are low- or no-VOC. The Eastern white cedar shingles used on the exterior of the home are locally grown and sourced. The result is a durable, naturally rot-resistant siding material.

Water Conservation

All fixtures are low-flow and low-volume.

Energy Efficient

This building is capable of achieving net zero energy, including a super-insulated, extremely airtight shell and high-performance, triple-glazed ventilating windows.
The house incorporates heat pump technology in the heating and cooling, and requires no furnace. It is also designed to maximize the use of natural light to save energy, requiring very little use of electrical lighting throughout the day.

Renewable Power

The house should provide all of its own energy on site with only 4-6 kW of PV due to both building performance and limited occupancy.